On behalf of Brown Law LLC on Sunday, January 10, 2016.

Holidays, holidays, what are the holidays? In Utah divorce and child custody situations, the answer to that question isn’t as easy as you would think.

Sure, all the major ones are there: Christmas, Thanksgiving, Fourth of July, spring break. But there are lots of others Utah throws in for good measure, for example: Martin Luther Kind Day, President’s Day, Memorial Day, Columbus Day (really?).

In total, there are about fifteen holidays included in Utah’s parent-time holiday schedule. Unfortunately, the law laying out all these holidays (Utah Code, Section 30-3-35(2)(c)-(h)) is not the easiest to read and figure out.

Because of this, we put together a grid that helps Utah parents better understand how holidays work in divorce and child custody.

When you read the grid below, keep this in mind: The custodial parent is entitled to the “odd numbered years” holidays designated in the schedule below in even years and the “even numbered years” holidays in odd years.

This way, holidays rotate year after year and each parent ends up with equal holiday time.

ODD NUMBERED YEARSEVEN NUMBERED YEARS
Child’s Birthday: on the day before or after the actual birthdate beginning at 3 p.m. until 9 p.m.; at the discretion of the noncustodial parent, he may take other siblings along for the birthday.Child’s Birthday: on actual birthdate beginning at 3 p.m. until 9 p.m.; at the discretion of the noncustodial parent, he may take other siblings along for the birthday.
Martin Luther King Jr.: beginning 6 p.m. Friday until Monday at 7 p.m. unless the holiday extends for a lengthier period of time to which the noncustodial parent is completely entitled.President’s Day: beginning at 6 p.m. on Friday until 7 p.m. on Monday unless the holiday extends for a lengthier period of time to which the noncustodial parent is completely entitled.
Spring Break: beginning at 6 p.m. on the day school lets out for the holiday until 7 p.m. on the Sunday before school resumes.Memorial Day: beginning at 6 p.m. on Friday until Monday at 7 p.m., unless the holiday extends for a lengthier period of time to which the noncustodial parent is completely entitled.
July 4th: beginning 6 p.m. the day before the holiday until 11 p.m. or no later than 6 p.m. on the day following the holiday, at the option of the parent exercising the holiday.July 24th: beginning 6 p.m. the day before the holiday until 11 p.m. or no later than 6 p.m. on the day following the holiday, at the option of the parent exercising the holiday.
Labor Day: beginning 6 p.m. on Friday until Monday at 7 p.m. unless the holiday extends for a lengthier period of time to which the noncustodial parent is completely entitled.Columbus Day: beginning at 6p.m. the day before the holiday until 7 p.m. on the holiday.
Fall School Break: if applicable, commonly known as U.E.A. weekend beginning at 6 p.m. on Wednesday until Sunday at 7 p.m. unless the holiday extends for a lengthier period of time to which the noncustodial parent is completely entitled.Halloween: on October 31 or the day Halloween is traditionally celebrated in the local community from after school until 9 p.m. if on a school day, or from 4 p.m. until 9 p.m.
Veteran’s Day Holiday: beginning 6 p.m. the day before the holiday until 7 p.m. on the holiday.Thanksgiving Holiday: beginning Wednesday at 7 p.m. until Sunday at 7 p.m..
Christmas School Vacation: the first portion of the Christmas school vacation including Christmas Eve and Christmas day continuing until 1 p.m. on the day halfway through the holiday period, if there are an odd number of days for the holiday period, or until 7 p.m. if there are an even number of days for the holiday period, so long as the entire holiday period is equally divided.Christmas School Vacation: the second portion of Christmas school vacation beginning 1 p.m. on the day halfway through the holiday period, if there are an odd number of days for the holiday period, or at 7 p.m. if there are an even number of days for the holiday period, so long as the entire Christmas holiday period is equally divided.

Father’s Day: with natural or adoptive father every year beginning at 9 a.m. until 7 p.m. on the holiday.

Mother’s Day: with natural or adoptive mother every year beginning at 9 a.m. until 7 p.m. on the holiday.

Once you get in to it, this holiday schedule is actually pretty well thought out.

And remember: you can always do holidays like you want as long as you agree. This is the schedule only if you can’t agree on something different.

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